Energy Drinks: Energize Your Knowledge

Abuansha, Mira, Eryn Fletcher, Enida Shehu, Venice Tanzo, and Tonya Zalenski

PURPOSE

The purpose is to inform dental health professionals about the oral implications of increased consumption of energy drinks.

HYPOTHESIS

Energy drinks are as detrimental to oral health, if not worse, than sugar containing sodas. Increased consumption by individuals between the ages of 12-30 years may substantially increase caries rates in consumers.

SUMMARY

Energy drinks are as detrimental to oral health, if not worse, than sugar containing sodas. Increased consumption by individuals between the ages of 12-30 years may substantially increase caries rates in consumers. Through clever advertising and use of slogans, the energy drink companies have managed to gain a high market share composed of pre-teen, teen, and young adults, who have adapted the drinking of energy drinks as part of their daily lifestyle. Not only does consumption have negative oral implications, but it also has systemic effects. Increased amount of caffeine intake is linked to seizures in adults, cardiac complications, and increased bone loss in the elderly. Energy drinks contain several additional ingredients which are marketed as healthy energy boosters. These claims are not evaluated by the food and drug administration and are not regulated like medicinal ingredients. This combination of ingredients is contributory to dental erosion more so than traditional soft drinks.

CONCLUSIONS

Energy drinks are detrimental because of sugar content, low pH, buffering capacity, and they are often consumed more often throughout the day than other beverages.