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Subtitle: Northern Humiliation and Southern Spirit.

Title: Anglo-African - August 26, 1965

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Anglo-African (1863 - 1865)

The writer comments on the demeanor of Robert E. Lee as he surrendered to Ulysses S. Grant. The writer notes that there was no humility in this surrender and it seemed to be based more on the South's inability to feed its troops than on any admission of wrong. This, he believes, leaves open the question of continuing the institution of slavery.

Description of file(s): two scanned, two columned, newspaper pages

Subtitle: Emancipation Proclamation Ignored, And a New Scheme of Southern Despotism Boldly Initiated.

Title: Anglo-African - September 3, 1865

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Anglo-African (1863 - 1865)

The writer tells his readers of the current violence following in the aftermath of the Civil War. Although slavery has been abolished, it has created an atmosphere of hatred in the Southern states as the newly freed slaves stand as a symbol of the defeat of the Confederacy. This is resulting in wholesale murder and mob violence.

Description of file(s): two scanned, two columned, newspaper pages

Subtitle: The West India Emancipation.

Title: Anglo-African - September 3, 1865

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Anglo-African (1863 - 1865)

The writer offers an overview of the situation in the British West Indies after emancipation. Although the feared violence never manifested, the growing tension between the newly freed slaves and former slave-owners was more pronounced than previously believed.

Description of file(s): one scanned newspaper column

Subtitle: The Southern Field and the Proper Agents.

Title: Anglo-African - September 9, 1865

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Anglo-African (1863 - 1865)

The writer explains that African Americans from the northern states are traveling south to offer education to the newly freed slaves. This action, he believes, is more beneficial to them than the good intentions of white educators who may unconsciously instill a feeling of inferiority and low self-esteem to those they teach. These well-intentioned white teachers in referring to newly freed slaves as "poor unfortunate creatures" are already assuming that the rescue of those they consider less than human.

Description of file(s): two scanned newspaper pages (three columns)

Subtitle: West India Emancipation.

Title: Colored American - August 5, 1837

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer explains the events surrounding the celebration of the anniversary of the emancipation of the British West Indies that is celebrated on August 1st. The celebration this year included signing petitions to bring about the immediate emancipation of Washington, DC.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Despotism, tyranny, and robbery in danger.

Title: Colored American - February 9, 1839

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer offers his view of the involvement of the Church in continuing the system of slavery.

Description of file(s): one scanned newspaper column

Subtitle: Liberty in the British West Indies.--Emancipation of the apprentices.

Title: Colored American - July, 1838

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer announces that the idea of apprenticeship as a way to slowly emancipate slaves in the British West Indies has been abandoned. As of August 1st, the slaves of the British West Indies will be completely emancipated.

Description of file(s): one scanned, one columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: West India Emancipation.

Title: Colored American - June 16, 1838

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer explains that when the British Parliment first passed the Emancipation Act to free the slaves of the British West Indies, they tacked on an apprenticeship of six years to the deal. This was done out of fear of what may happen if the thousands of slaves were freed at once. The islands, however, rejected this clause and provided their slaves with immediate emancipation. The feared violence never manifested. It is now up to Parliament to revise their law.

Description of file(s): one scanned, one columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Maryland Colonizationist Standing Boldly Out.

Title: Colored American - June 19, 1841

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer comments on an upcoming convention of Colonizationists to be held in Baltimore. Although this is ostensibly a religious based convention, the goal is to urge African Americans to leave the state. The writer shares one resolution warning those who stay that the members of the convention can't be held responsible for the consequences of such a choice.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Immediate Emancipation.

Title: Colored American - June 9, 1838

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer questions the fears of immediate emancipation of slaves in the U.S. that seem to be holding back legislation that will free the slaves. He points to the emancipation of the British West Indies as proof that this can be done without the bloodshed that opponents of immediate emancipation fear most.

Description of file(s): one scanned, one columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Universal Emancipation.

Title: Colored American - March 25, 1837

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer calls for an end to slavery throughout the U.S. He advises those African Americans who live in states without slavery to present a religious life of morality and "industry" in order to promote emancipation and gain support for the cause.

Description of file(s): one scanned, one columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Northern distress produced by Southern slavery.

Title: Colored American - May 13, 1837

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer expresses his views regarding the negative impact that southern slavery has on the economics of the northern states.

Description of file(s): one scanned, one columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: The Emigration Scheme.

Title: Colored American - November 13, 1841

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer comments on a pamphlet published by a woman who recently returned from Jamaica. The writer of the pamphlet, along with the American Consul and the editor of the Liberator newspaper all agree that immigrating to the West Indies is an unwise choice for African Americans.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Immediate Emancipation.

Title: Colored American - November 16, 1839

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer notes the success of immediate emancipation in other countries, and expresses his belief that the U.S. must follow suit.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: The Certainty of Universal Emancipation.

Title: Colored American - September 22, 1838

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer expresses his view that as each country outside the U.S. frees its slaves, the U.S. gets closer to the end of slavery. The writer holds that universal emancipation is on the horizon. He asks his readers to be encouarged and to be patient.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: "Emancipation Promotes Insurrection."

Title: Colored Citizen - November 7, 1863

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored Citizen (1863 - 18??)

The writer comments on an incident in England where a minister refused to invite his congregation to a lecture on emancipation. The minister aligned with the ideas of Lord Brougham regarding emancipation which seem now to the writer to be in direct contradiction to his earlier views.

Description of file(s): one scanned newspaper column

Subtitle: Third Anniversary of President Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation.

Title: Elevator - December 15, 1865

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Elevator (1865 - 18??)

The writer alerts his readers to plans being made to celebrate the anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation in January.

Description of file(s): one scanned newspaper column

Subtitle: Fillmore's Southern Tour.

Title: Frederick Douglass' Paper - April 12, 1854

Speaker or author: Watkins, William J.

Newspaper or publication: Frederick Douglass' Paper (1851 - 18??)

The writer comments on a speech delivered by former president Millard Fillmore delivered in New Orleans during his tour of the southern states.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Southern Methodists on Dancing.

Title: Frederick Douglass' Paper - February 2, 1855

Speaker or author: Watkins, William J.

Newspaper or publication: Frederick Douglass' Paper (1851 - 18??)

The writer tells his readers that while dancing and gambling were condemned at a recent Methodist-Protestant convention, no mention was made of slavery. Silence on this subject gave an unspoken approval of it by the Church.

Description of file(s): one scanned newspaper column

Subtitle: Southern Consistency.

Title: Northern Star and Freemen's Advocate - March 10, 1842

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Northern Star and Freemen's Advocate (1842 - 18??)

The editor shares with his readers incidents of injustice pertaining to oppresssive laws regarding African Americans in Alabama and Maryland.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

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Records (37)

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