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Subtitle: The Thirty-Ninth Congress.

Title: Anglo-African - December 23, 1865

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Anglo-African (1863 - 1865)

The writer comments on the proceedings of the first session of the Thirty-Ninth Congress. Debate about laws and civil rights for the newly freed slaves after Reconstruction made this session an important one.

Description of file(s): two scanned newspaper pages (three columns)

Subtitle: Thanks to God for Victory.

Title: Anglo-African - December 23, 1865

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Anglo-African (1863 - 1865)

The writer celebrates the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution that abolishes slavery forever in the U.S. and provides for the protection of freedom for all citizens.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: New York, December 9, 1865. The Situation.

Title: Anglo-African - December 9, 1865

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Anglo-African (1863 - 1865)

The writer reported on conventions held in several states. He gave a brief overview of each.

Description of file(s): two scanned, two columned, newspaper pages

Subtitle: The Nat Turner Insurrection.

Title: Anglo-African Magazine - December, 1859

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Anglo-African Magazine (1859 - 1860)

Detailed confession of Nat Turner as he was being held in prison shortly after capture. The editor compares Nat Turner's actions with those of John Brown's. Included is a list of African Americans (both slaves and free) who were charged in the conspiracy.

Description of file(s): seven scanned magazine pages (23 columns)

Subtitle: The Anglo-African Magazine for 1860

Title: Anglo-African Magazine - December, 1859

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Anglo-African Magazine (1859 - 1860)

The editor thanks his readers for their support in 1859 and calls upon them to renew their subscriptions early for 1860. He tells them the next addition will include "a sketch" of the life of Ira Aldridge.

Description of file(s): one scanned magazine column

Subtitle: Appearance.

Title: Colored American - December 1, 1838

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer suggests that his readers spend their money on the $250 yearly voter registration fee instead of on expensive clothing and unnecessary travel.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: "Thy sins will surely find thee out."

Title: Colored American - December 15, 1838

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer comments on the recent changes that have been introduced into Pennsylvania's "revised" state Constitution.

Description of file(s): one scanned, one columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Liberia.

Title: Colored American - December 15, 1838

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer comments on the goal of Christian missionaries to "Christianize" Africa and thus help to establish a "civilized" colony there. This work currently includes the purchase of a ship for colonizationn purposes.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Right of Suffrage.

Title: Colored American - December 15, 1838

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer encourages his readers to purchase the $250 worth of real estate required to establish the right to vote. He also encourages them to use this voting power to help change the suffrage restrictions that apply to African Americans.

Description of file(s): one scanned newspaper column

Subtitle: President's Message.

Title: Colored American - December 15, 1838

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

Brief comment on a recent presidential speech. The writer suggests that by the his silence on the subject of abolition, Martin Van Buren has offered a boost to the American Colonization Society's cause.

Description of file(s): one scanned newspaper column

Subtitle: "Behold, we count them happy who endure."

Title: Colored American - December 16, 1837

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer notes that while the intentions of white abolitionists are honorable and sincere, they often carry with them the "low" prejudice of feeling superior to the oppressed people they are helping. This furthers the separation of the races and continues to delay the achievement of true social equality.

Description of file(s): one scanned, one columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: A Dangerous Spirit.

Title: Colored American - December 16, 1837

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer cautions his readers to keep a watchful eye on the rebellious nature of Canadians who may interfer with the U.S. government. He warns that there are rebels in Canada, as well as in the territory of Texas who will seek to unsettle the Union.

Description of file(s): one scanned, one columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Religion.

Title: Colored American - December 16, 1837

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The editor offers the newspaper's stance on the question of the abolition of slavery. He believes that in this matter God will make the choice ("Thy Will be done"), and the newspaper will not offer a firm stance against slavery. At the same time, he trusts that God is against this system of human bondage.

Description of file(s): one scanned, one columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: The Editor's Difficulties.

Title: Colored American - December 16, 1837

Speaker or author: Cornish, Samuel E.

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The editor asks his readers to help compensate him for his work at the newspaper. He asks that each subscriber send at least $5 each to help supplement his salary. He explains that as it is now, his salary is nowhere near what other editors are paid.

Description of file(s): one scanned, one columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Oneida Institute.

Title: Colored American - December 16, 1837

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer provides a positive commentary on the Oneida Institute both for its educational program and its excellent faculty.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Extract - Important.

Title: Colored American - December 16, 1837

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The editor responds to a letter expressing fear that the African American people of Pennsylvania will be disenfranchised and banished from the state due to recent changes in the state's constitution.

Description of file(s): one scanned, one columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Methodist Church.

Title: Colored American - December 16, 1837

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer reports on his recent visit to a local Methodist Church. While he enjoyed the sermon and the decor of the church itself, the question of slavery still remains a sensitive issue to Methodist dogma. The preacher believed it best to say as little as possible about what he believed to be a "semi-political" issue. Yet by his silence on the issue, he allowed for an implied condoning of it by the Church. Although the preacher felt lack of action by the Church carried little weight, this effectively aided in continuing the system since no one was encouraged to oppose it.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Right of Suffrage.

Title: Colored American - December 16, 1837

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer reminds his readers of the importance of suffrage for all Americans. He expresses his view that "without the right of suffrage, we are, and must remain, a nonentity in the State and National governments...." He urges his readers to petition the government for the rught of suffrage for free African Americans.

Description of file(s): one scanned, one columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: The Church Must Awake!

Title: Colored American - December 2, 1837

Speaker or author: Sears, Robert

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer hopes that the recent murder of a newspaper owner in Illinois will cause the Church to change its position and begin to preach against slavery. By its silence (and even its own slave ownership in some cases), the Church conveyes a message of acceptance of slavery to its congregations. The writer emphasizes the power of the Church to sway public opinion and he hopes this event will stir ministers to action that will put an end to slavery and prejudice.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Literary Retrenchment.

Title: Colored American - December 2, 1837

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer encourages his readers to seek a “classical” education, which emphasizes literature, languages and science. Currently schools are adjusting their curriculum to omit subjects that are deemed unnecessary to employment. The concentration is changing to offer more of an emphasis on mechanics than on intellectual pursuits.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

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Records (320)

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