RE:SEARCH logo
University of Detroit Mercy Libraries / Instructional Design Studio
UDM HOME KNOWLEDGE [BLACKBOARD] TITAN CONNECT QUICK LINKS
RESEARCH HOME / FIND / SPECIAL COLLECTIONS / BLACK ABOLITIONIST ARCHIVE
Black Abolitionist Archive

Collection Home

Browse by

Speaker or author

Organization

Keywords

Newspaper or publication

Speeches with audio

Questions or comments on this collection? Please email higopa@udmercy.edu.

Black Abolitionist Archive

Search for
Records (34)
prev | 1 - 34 | next

Title: Amos G. Beman

Speaker or author: Beman, Amos Gerry, 1812-1874

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

Speech regarding the principles, goals and value of the New York Committee of Vigilance in its assistance to people of color.

Description of file(s): PDF 11 page, 2,773 word document (text and images)

Title: Amos G. Beman

Speaker or author: Beman, Amos Gerry, 1812-1874

Newspaper or publication: North Star

Brief speech expressing the speaker's outrage at the defeat of African American suffrage in Connecticut. The speaker blamed the defeat on Irish voters. (Includes MP3 audio file.)

Description of file(s): PDF 1 page, 228 word document (text and image)

Title: Amos G. Beman

Speaker or author: Beman, Amos Gerry, 1812-1874

Newspaper or publication: Emancipator

Excerpt of a speech delivered before the Congregational Church in Hartford, Connecticut and published in the Emancipator newspaper. The newspaper notes that: "Mr. B. endeavors successfully, in his address, to show, that the colored race may be elevated in this country, in respect to property, intelligence, and moral worth; which he declares are the elements of true happiness and prosperity. Having concluded his argument, he makes an eloquent and earnest appeal to his hearers, to inspire them with resolution to overcome the obstacles in the way of their elevation." (Includes MP3 audio file.)

Description of file(s): PDF 3 page, 657 word document (text and images)

Title: Charles L. Reason

Speaker or author: Reason, Charles Lewis, 1818-1893

Newspaper or publication: National Anti-Slavery Standard

Speech denouncing the plans and goals of the American Colonization Society. The speaker stressed that this idea is just a scheme to remove African Americans from the U.S.

Description of file(s): PDF 5 page, 1,221 word document (text and images)

Title: Charles L. Reason

Speaker or author: Reason, Charles Lewis, 1818-1893

Newspaper or publication: National Anti-Slavery Standard

Speech given against the goals of the American Colonization Society and the speaker's belief that colonization of Africa simply offered another type of enslavement to African Americans.

Description of file(s): PDF 11 page, 3,314 word document (text and images)

Title: Charles L. Reason

Speaker or author: Reason, Charles Lewis, 1818-1893

Newspaper or publication: Pennsylvania Freeman

Speech dedicating a library for the Institute for Colored Youth stressing the benefits of education to the elevation of the race.

Description of file(s): PDF 13 page, 3,096 word document (text and images)

Title: Charles Reason

Speaker or author: Reason, Charles Lewis, 1818-1893

Newspaper or publication: Impartial Citizen

Brief speech by Charles Reason, professor at New York Central College describing the college and the area surrounding its location.

Description of file(s): PDF 1 page, 179 word document (text and images)

Title: John Mercer Langston

Speaker or author: Langston, John Mercer, 1829-1897.

Newspaper or publication: Elevator (Incomplete)

Eloquent speech regarding the positive changes the speaker could already see as a result of the end of the Civil War and the emancipation of the slaves. The speaker stressed, however, that more changes were needed before racial equality could be realized.

Description of file(s): PDF 5 page, 1,141 word document (text and images)

Title: John Mercer Langston

Speaker or author: Langston, John Mercer, 1829-1897.

Newspaper or publication: Anti-Slavery Bugle

The speaker stressed that where there is one person legally enslaved in the U.S., there is no liberty for anyone. Slavery makes slaves of us all. When a government encourages slavery, it evokes a need to control the slaves. This requires laws which limit freedom for everyone. The speaker offered examples to substantiate his ideas.

Description of file(s): PDF 12 page, 3,349 word document (text and images)

Title: John Mercer Langston

Speaker or author: Langston, John Mercer, 1829-1897.

Newspaper or publication: Anti-Slavery Bugle

Speech regarding the inhumanity of slavery, emphasizing the government backing the institution of slavery receives that keeps it strongly in place.

Description of file(s): PDF 4 page, 973 word document (text and images)

Title: John Mercer Langston

Speaker or author: Langston, John Mercer, 1829-1897.

Newspaper or publication: Elevator

Impassioned speech in which the speaker emphasized that along with freedom, African Americans were entitled to all the privileges of citizenship including suffrage, legal, social and political rights. Denying a citizen these rights on the basis of color was illogical, irrational, and uncivilized.

Description of file(s): PDF 10 page, 2,101 word document (text and images)

Title: John Mercer Langston

Speaker or author: Langston, John Mercer, 1829-1897.

Newspaper or publication: Presscopy -- New York Historical Society -- Pamphlet Collection

The speaker traced the history of the human struggle for freedom, justice and liberty. He emphasized that the struggle for emancipation of the slaves was part of this universal, human struggle for freedom. The speaker stressed that all human beings have an innate desire to be free, and this is their birthright.

Description of file(s): PDF 25 page, 8,341 word document (text and images)

Title: John Mercer Langston

Speaker or author: Langston, John Mercer, 1829-1897.

Newspaper or publication: Liberator

The speaker emphasized that the law in South Carolina that authorized "the sale of any Negro or Mulatto found in the state more than 12 days" was being used to sell white people more than fugitive slaves. He noted that any man could be called a mulatto and sold under this law. He urged reform and called for the white public to get involved for their own sake.

Description of file(s): PDF 5 page, 1,378 word document (text and images)

Title: John Mercer Langston

Speaker or author: Langston, John Mercer, 1829-1897.

Newspaper or publication: National Anti-Slavery Standard

Speech regarding the ways in which slavery has "...corrupted the whole mass of American society." The speaker points out political issues as well as women's issues that have been and continue to be affected by the political and economic power of the institution of slavery. (Speech 16796 is a duplicate of this speech.)

Description of file(s): PDF 10 page, 2,761 word document (text and images)

Title: John Mercer Langston

Speaker or author: Langston, John Mercer, 1829-1897.

Newspaper or publication: Jefferson City, [MO] Democrat

Overview of speech delivered before the House of Representatives. The speaker spoke for the suffrage and civil rights of the newly freed slaves. He emphasized that they were newly acquired citizens of the U.S. and deserved all the rights that went along with that status.

Description of file(s): PDF 5 page, 1,117 word document (text and images)

Title: John Mercer Langston

Speaker or author: Langston, John Mercer, 1829-1897.

Newspaper or publication: Nashville Times and True Union

Speech delivered before a mixed race audience in the House of Representatives. The speaker stressed his hope for a brighter future for the former slaves. He spoke of the injustice suffered by slaves over the years since slavery was first established in the U.S. He paid special attention to the contributions and sacrifices that African Americans had made to the country, and his hope for future racial harmony.

Description of file(s): PDF 9 page, 2,243 word document (text and images)

Title: John Mercer Langston

Speaker or author: Langston, John Mercer, 1829-1897.

Newspaper or publication: Presscopy -- Harvard University -- Anti-Slavery Pamphlets

Eloquent comment denouncing the Fugitive Slave Law. The speaker noted that a just law "...commands what is right, and prohibits what is wrong," and that the Fugitive Slave Law has made a mockery of this basic tenet.

Description of file(s): PDF 1 page, 307 word document (text and image)

Title: John Mercer Langston

Speaker or author: Langston, John Mercer, 1829-1897.

Newspaper or publication: Anti-Slavery Bugle

Brief speech discounting the Democratic party's pro-slavery stance and the laws that had resulted from its influence.

Description of file(s): PDF 2 page, 491 word document (text and images)

Title: John Mercer Langston

Speaker or author: Langston, John Mercer, 1829-1897.

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

Patriotic speech urging patience while waiting for what the speaker believes is the inevitability of the end of slavery. The speaker emphasizes the duty of all citizens to defend their country and to fight heroically. He believes that England, France and the entire civilized world are expecting the U.S. to end slavery.

Description of file(s): PDF 3 page, 635 word document (text and images)

Title: John Mercer Langston

Speaker or author: Langston, John Mercer, 1829-1897.

Newspaper or publication: Presscopy -- Boston Athenaeum -- Pamphlet Collection

Brief overview of a speech made at the National Convention of Colored Men held in Syracuse, New York. The speaker emphasized that all races were made slaves if the system of oligarchy were allowed to continue.

Description of file(s): PDF 1 page, 197 word document (text and image)

prev | 1 - 34 | next
Records (34)

University of Detroit Mercy
4001 W. McNichols Detroit , MI , 48221-3038
This site is endorsed by the University of Detroit Mercy (UDM) and supports the views, values, and mission of UDM. The University of Detroit Mercy web site provides links to other web sites, both public and private, for informational purposes. The inclusion of these links on UDM's site does not imply endorsement by the University. Please contact the Instructional Design Studio for any questions regarding this web site.