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Records (33)
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Subtitle: Dignity of Labor.

Title: Elevator - June 16, 1865

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Elevator (1865 - 18??)

The writer encourages young people to strive for obtaining the best jobs possible. Next to education, he finds this endeavor of utmost importance to their individual well-being and the advancement of the race.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: What do the Fugitives in Canada Stand in Need of? No. III.

Title: Voice of the Fugitive - April 23, 1851

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Voice of the Fugitive (1851 - 1852)

The writer suggests that instead of donations of food and clothing, fugitive slaves would be better served with financial aid to help purchase land. (Incomplete) See Voice of the Fugitive editorial 11524edi.

Description of file(s): two scanned newspaper pages (three columns)

Subtitle: African Colonization.

Title: Voice of the Fugitive - December 17, 1851

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Voice of the Fugitive (1851 - 1852)

The writer comments on an article published in another newspaper about the feared fate of slaves if they are emancipated.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Reciprocity with the United States.

Title: Voice of the Fugitive - January 15, 1852

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Voice of the Fugitive (1851 - 1852)

The writer responds to recent statistics regarding trade between Canada and the U.S. Purchasing goods from the U.S. not only encourages the continuation of slavery, but opens the possibility of the American annexation of Canada.

Description of file(s): one scanned newspaper column

Subtitle: Homes for the Fugitive Slaves in Canada.

Title: Voice of the Fugitive - May 7, 1851

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Voice of the Fugitive (1851 - 1852)

The writer urges those who would aid the fugitives in Canada to send money to finance the purchase of land. He encourages his readers to stand united in their efforts to stay in Canada and build a life for themselves there.

Description of file(s): two scanned, two columned, newspaper pages

Subtitle: The Industrial Society in Sandwich.

Title: Voice of the Fugitive - October 22, 1851

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Voice of the Fugitive (1851 - 1852)

The writer tells his readers that while the term "industrial society in Sandwich" may sound like an institution of higher learning, no school exists in this area.

Description of file(s): one scanned newspaper column

Subtitle: Gerrit Smith's Land.

Title: Voice of the Fugitive - October 8, 1851

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Voice of the Fugitive (1851 - 1852)

The writer tells his readers that land donated to African Americans in New York by Gerrit Smith was being taken by speculators. This act of generosity is now part of a great fraud and attempt to discourage recipients from settling on it.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Industry and Genius.

Title: Weekly Advocate - January 28, 1837

Speaker or author: Sears, Robert

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Advocate (1837)

The writer praised Philip A. Bell not only for his intellect, but for his "industry." The writer believed that all men of knowledge possessed a drive towards using their knowledge and attaining success through intellectual prowess. This drive and intellect could be beneficial in aiding a downtrodden race. The writer encouraged education and industry.

Description of file(s): two scanned newspaper pages (three columns)

Subtitle: Put Money in Thy Purse.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - August 13, 1859

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer discusses the power of money and the potential dire consequences when money is lacking. He urges his readers to save their money, spend it wisely, and teach their children to value its power.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: An "Occupation Gone."

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - January 11, 1862

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer discusses the social changes taking place in the U.S. with the Civil War. He believes that this marks this end of "Negro hatred" and prejudice in the U.S.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: The Free Colored People of Louisiana.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - July 30, 1859

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer comments on an article published in a New Orleans newspaper praising the African American community in New Orleans. He compares the reporting of newspaper editors in New Orleans with that of editors in New York and finds the northern editors lacking honesty and integrity.

Description of file(s): one scanned newspaper column

Subtitle: The Revival of an Old Branch of Commerce.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - June 23, 1860

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer describes various ships that he believes are still participating in the slave trade. Although this practice is illegal, as long as there is money to be made, this will continue. He believes that if the transport of Africans to the U.S. for the purpose of slavery is officially declared piracy by the U.S. government, the laws will be better enforced, and the slave trade will end.

Description of file(s): two scanned, two columned, newspaper pages

Title: William Wells Brown

Speaker or author: Brown, William Wells, 1814?-1884

Newspaper or publication: Liberator

The speaker addresses the question of what to do with the slaves if they are freed. Although some people had cautioned that the slaves would be lost without slavery, the speaker offered various examples of how they would be and aleady were capable of prospering as free citizens.

Description of file(s): PDF 15 page, 4,233 word document (text and images)

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Records (33)

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