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Subtitle: Flax Cotton.

Title: Voice of the Fugitive - July 30, 1851

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Voice of the Fugitive (1851 - 1852)

With the introduction of Chevalier Claussen's new cotton processing for flax, the writer sees an opportunity for northern free labor (in terms of agricultural endeavors) to compete with southern cotton growers and finally put an end to the system of slavery.

Description of file(s): two scanned newspaper pages (three columns)

Subtitle: No. 1 Colored Emigration to Canada and the West Indies.

Title: Voice of the Fugitive - November 19, 1851

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Voice of the Fugitive (1851 - 1852)

The writer discusses immigration to Canada and the British West Indies by African Americans. He examines this subject from five perspectives: "commercial, agricultural, social, mental, and political."

Description of file(s): two scanned, two columned, newspaper pages

Subtitle: Emancipation.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - April 5, 1862

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer points to several social and political events that signal the end of slavery. With the end of the war, emancipation must be included in the peace and change that follows.

Description of file(s): two scanned, two columned, newspaper pages

Subtitle: New York, April 6, 1861. Cottonocracy.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - April 6, 1861

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

Slave labor would not be necessary if not for the production of cotton, one of the most important products in the civilized world at this point. The threat of abolishing slavery, is perceived as including a threat of losing the cotton supply for many countries. The solution expressed by the writer is to create a system of free labor for the production of cotton. This will benefit not only the economic growth of the country but an entire race of people as well.

Description of file(s): four scanned newspaper pages (seven columns)

Subtitle: Secession.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - December 22, 1860

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer comments on the current political focus on secession, and the growing tension between the northern and southern states.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: The Great Eastern.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - July 7, 1860

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer discusses possible uses for the Great Eastern ship that made its maiden voyage to America in June. The ship was originally built to take advantage of the increase in immigration to Australia.

Description of file(s): one scanned, three columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Mr. Horace Greeley's Dislikes.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - March 19, 1860

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer offers commentary on Horace Greeley's recent editorial in the New York Tribune in which he expresses his hatred for people of African descent. The writer points out that if Mr. Greeley feels this way then he must also hate all the progress the country has made. Without the help of those he has come to hate, this would not have been possible.

Description of file(s): one scanned, three columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: The Key-Notes.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - May 11, 1861

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer provides an overview of a war meeting held in Boston. J. Sella Martin who presided over the meeting said that those African Americans who aren't willing to volunteer to fight for freedom should move to Hayti and raise cotton.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Virginia Hospitality.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - May 11, 1861

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

Brief commentary on a story published in another newspaper regarding sailors, rescued from a wrecked ship, who were thrown into prison in Virginia and threatened with starvation if they didn't agree to fight for the South. The writer urges all African Americans to cooperate with the Northern forces in this fight for freedom.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: The Rights of Human Nature.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - November 16, 1861

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer comments on a portion of a speech delivered by Abraham Lincoln to the Swedish Minister. This speech addresses the U.S.'s commitment to "maintain the rights of human nature, and the man of capacity for self-government." The writer wonders how this ties in with the current social status of African Americans, both free and enslaved.

Description of file(s): two scanned, two columned, newspaper pages

Subtitle: "What shall be done with the Slaves?"

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - November 23, 1861

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer considers two suggestions for dealing with the slaves once they are free men and women.

Description of file(s): three scanned newspaper pages (five columns)

Title: William Craft

Speaker or author: Craft, William

Newspaper or publication: Patriot

Overview of speech regarding the speaker's views of what was influencing the continued fighting in the Civil War. He also presented details to his audience about his efforts to get the King of Dahomey (in Africa) to abandon the slave trade.

Description of file(s): PDF 1 page, 297 word document (text and image)

Title: William Howard Day

Speaker or author: Day, William Howard, d. 1900

Newspaper or publication: Douglass' Monthly

Brief speech in which the speaker appealed to his Irish audience for help in the fight for emancipation. He gave an example of the conditions under which the slaves live and blamed the cotton industry for the continuation of slavery.

Description of file(s): PDF 2 page, 352 word document (text and images)

Title: William Howard Day

Speaker or author: Day, William Howard, d. 1900

Newspaper or publication: Presscopy -- Birmingham, England -- Public Libraryq

The speaker presented an overview of the goals of the African Aid Society to help fugitive slaves who had escaped to Canada immigrate to Africa. He blamed the over-reliance on the economic value of cotton for continued slavery in the U.S.

Description of file(s): PDF 1 page, 374 word document (text and image)

Title: William Howard Day

Speaker or author: Day, William Howard, d. 1900

Newspaper or publication: Leeds Mercury

The speaker proposed that the best way to end slavery is for Europe to boycott cotton grown in the U.S. He advocated that Great Britain and European countries buy cotton grown in Africa instead. This would remove the power of cotton and its contribution to continuing slavery in the U.S. It would also help Liberia to flourish economically.

Description of file(s): PDF 1 page, 297 word document (text and image)

Title: William Wells Brown

Speaker or author: Brown, William Wells, 1814?-1884

Newspaper or publication: Liberator

Speech regarding the question of expatriation and what to do with freed slaves once the Civil War was over. The speaker believed that slavery would end with the end of the war, but he could see the potential problems in a future society including newly freed slaves.

Description of file(s): PDF 6 page, 1,757 word document (text and images)

Title: William Wells Brown

Speaker or author: Brown, William Wells, 1814?-1884

Newspaper or publication: Liberator

Eloquent, knowledgable and intelligent rebuttal to a speech given by William Lowndes Yancey encouraging sucession, state's rights, and a continuation of slavery. Mr. Yancey, as a member of the "fire-eaters" (radical sucessionists) supported and encouraged events that lead up to the Civil War.

Description of file(s): PDF 13 page, 3,710 word document (text and images)

Title: William Wells Brown

Speaker or author: Brown, William Wells, 1814?-1884

Newspaper or publication: Pine and Palm

The speaker described the turbulent history of Hayti in detail stressing the battles and triumphs of its military heroes. He stressed that those seeking to immigrate to Hayti would find it rich in natural resources, especially cotton and coffee, which offered competition to slave-grown produce in the U.S. [This speech is a continuation of speech 24115, published in the June 15, 1861 issue of the Pine and Palm.]

Description of file(s): PDF 13 page, 3,436 word document (text and images)

Title: William Wells Brown

Speaker or author: Brown, William Wells, 1814?-1884

Newspaper or publication: Liberator

Speech regarding the history of the abolition of slavery in the British West Indies. The speaker stressed the irony of the continuation of slavery in the U.S., a country founded on freedom.

Description of file(s): PDF 9 page, 2,387 word document (text and images)

Title: William Wells Brown

Speaker or author: Brown, William Wells, 1814?-1884

Newspaper or publication: National Anti-Slavery Standard

Anecdotal speech with numerous examples illustrating the hardships and irrationality of slavery. The speaker emphasized the prevalence of amalgamation.

Description of file(s): PDF 12 page, 3,489 word document (text and images)

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Records (40)

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