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Black Abolitionist Archive

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Records (14)
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Subtitle: Friday, July 27. What Can We Do?

Title: Colored American - July 28, 1838

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer urges his readers to pray for those who are suffering under the scourge of prejudice and racial violence. He also urges them to pray for those who commit such violent acts upon their fellow human beings.

Description of file(s): one scanned, one columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Another State Convention.

Title: Colored American - June 19, 1841

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer alerts his readers to another convention to be held to continue the work sparked by the previous one. Only by working together and by reinforcing this union can African Americans succeed in their quest for freedom.

Description of file(s): one scanned newspaper column

Subtitle: Political Abolition.

Title: Colored American - November 16, 1839

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

Commentary on the role politics plays in the fight for the abolition of slavery. The writer expresses his opinion on the current state of this battle in the political arena.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page (section missing)

Subtitle: Moral Abolition.

Title: Colored American - November 16, 1839

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer expresses his views regarding abolition and political action. Abolition is a moral decision, and politics is the forum for translation of this decision into action.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page (part missing)

Subtitle: Politics.

Title: Colored American - October 10, 1840

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer stresses the importance of political action and the exercising of voting rights in the work to abolish slavery.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: New York Safe.

Title: Colored American - October 2, 1841

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer gives an overview of the annual meeting of the New York Anti-Slavery Society held in Utica. The meeting was well received and a great success. Issues addressed were independent political action and "Church action."

Description of file(s): one scanned newspaper column

Subtitle: A Vestage of Pro-Slavery.

Title: Colored American - October 5, 1839

Speaker or author: Cornish, Samuel E. (Samuel Eli), 1795?-1858

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer comments on an exchange between Samuel Cornish and Philip Bell regarding a statement published in the Friend of Man newspaper. The Friend of Man's brief statement was from a representative of the New York Anti-Slavery Society saying they would not support the Colored American newspaper until it changed its political point of view.

Description of file(s): two scanned newspaper pages (three columns)

Subtitle: County Committees.

Title: Colored American - October 9, 1841

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Colored American (1837 - 1842)

The writer gives an overview of the responsibilities of the newly formed county committees set up by a recent state convention.

Description of file(s): one scanned newspaper page

Subtitle: "What have the Abolitionists done?"

Title: Frederick Douglass' Paper - December 8, 1854

Speaker or author: Watkins, William J.

Newspaper or publication: Frederick Douglass' Paper (1851 - 18??)

The writer continues his answer to the question "What have the Abolitionists done?" that he began in a previous issue. He explains that abolitionists have kept the focus on the issue of slavery by agitation, speeches, aid to fugitives, and an untiring devotion to the cause of freedom. The have suffered imprisonment, shame, and personal attacks for what they believe is right.

Description of file(s): three scanned newspaper pages (five columns)

Subtitle: What are we Doing?

Title: Frederick Douglass' Paper - February 2, 1855

Speaker or author: Watkins, William J.

Newspaper or publication: Frederick Douglass' Paper (1851 - 18??)

The writer encourages his readers to be patient regarding the inevitable end of slavery. But patience is not a matter of simply waiting for something to happen. It is instead a way of looking for opportunities towards action. He assures them that freedom that is fought for is sweeter than freedom that is "bestowed upon us."

Description of file(s): two scanned newspaper pages (three columns)

Subtitle: Are we ready for the Conflict?

Title: Frederick Douglass' Paper - February 9, 1855

Speaker or author: Watkins, William J.

Newspaper or publication: Frederick Douglass' Paper (1851 - 18??)

The writer emphasizes that slavery is not just an African American problem, but a problem for humanity. If freedom is valued it is worth fighting for. He notes the history of slavery and the freedom that followed and stresses that this freedom was not won without a fight. He shares a statement made to him by a white abolitionist who said, "Your people, sir, will never be done paying us for our efforts in your behalf." This sentiment, he tells his readers, is reason enough for African Americans to keep fighting on their own behalf.

Description of file(s): three scanned newspaper pages (five columns)

Subtitle: Worthy of Imitation.

Title: Weekly Advocate - February 18, 1837

Speaker or author: Bell, Philip A.

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Advocate (1837)

The editor responds to a letter of praise from William S. Jennings. Mr. Jennings complimented the newspaper and its work towards providing information and knowledge to African Americans. He also contributed to these efforts by finding new subscribers for the newspaper.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: To Our Friends.

Title: Weekly Advocate - February 18, 1837

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Advocate (1837)

The editor stresses the rise in the cost of everything except the Weekly Advocate. He implies that the newspaper's cost may rise too without an increase in subscriptions.

Description of file(s): one scanned, one columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Progress and Faith.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - May 4, 1861

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer points out that progress is a cyclical process, not a linear one. In this, progress made through Anti-Slavery agitation is taking the form of political action, of a seemingly quiet revolution that is now coming to the surface in this civil war. He reminds his readers that their actions now shape the future for the entire race.

Description of file(s): two scanned, two columned, newspaper pages

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Records (14)

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