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Black Abolitionist Archive

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Records (38)
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Title: Provincial Freeman - May 26, 1855

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Provincial Freeman (1853 - 1859)

The writer notes the increase in immigration to Canada from all nationalities previously living in the U.S. He tells his readers that all are welcome in Canada provided they are ready to loyal and tolerant.

Description of file(s): one scanned newspaper column

Subtitle: Amalgamation.

Title: Provincial Freeman - November 17, 1855

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Provincial Freeman (1853 - 1859)

The writer expresses his thoughts on amalgamation. He believes that once society accepts amalgamation as a natural part of humanity there will be peace and harmony in the world.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Title: Samuel Ringgold Ward

Speaker or author: Ward, Samuel Ringgold, b. 1817

Newspaper or publication: British Banner

Brief speech delivered while seconding a resolution for continued missionary efforts in Ireland.

Description of file(s): PDF 2 page, 350 word document (text and images)

Subtitle: Mr. Jones

Title: Thomas Cordoza

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

Lively and interesting debate regarding the question "Which has sustained the most injustice at the hands of the American people, the American Indian or the Anglo-African?"

Description of file(s): PDF 5 page, 1,099 word document (text and images)

Subtitle: Colored Men Awake to Your Interest.

Title: Voice of the Fugitive - January 15, 1852

Speaker or author: G.

Newspaper or publication: Voice of the Fugitive (1851 - 1852)

The writer responds to an article published in another newspaper urging people of African (and Irish) descent to buy land now in Canada, and settle in a country that's less hostile to them than the U.S.

Description of file(s): two scanned newspaper pages (three columns)

Subtitle: American Liberty.

Title: Voice of the Fugitive - November 5, 1851

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Voice of the Fugitive (1851 - 1852)

The writer compares and contrasts the meaning of liberty to the French and to the Americans.

Description of file(s): two scanned newspaper pages (three columns)

Subtitle: A Speech and a Comment.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - February 1, 1862

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

Brief review of a speech delivered by Charles Lenox Remond on the 29th anniversary of the Massacusetts Anti-Slavery Society. The speaker praised the work of the society and addressed issues of the day.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: The Anglo-African and the Irrepressible Conflict.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - February 4, 1860

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

Commentary on how misinformation is spread throughout the country via unscrupulous newspaper reporting. He cites the New York Herald as being particularly good at this type of prejudicial reporting which just adds to the racial tension already present between the free states in the north the and slave states in the south.

Description of file(s): one scanned, three columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: The "Irrepressible Conflict."

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - January 14, 1860

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer discusses the political life of William H. Seward. He includes with this commentary on how the actions of John Brown at Harper's Ferry were affecting the political situation in the country.

Description of file(s): one scanned, three columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: New Books.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - January 19, 1861

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer offers a brief review of a new book published by African explorer Robert Campbell. He comments on Campbell's findings that slavery is prevalent in Africa, and on other interesting information about the country. He tells his readers that if it had not been for the existence of slavery in Africa, there would be no slavery in the U.S.; that slavery existed there thousands of years before the discovery of America.

Description of file(s): one scanned, three columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Mr. Garnet's Reply to Dr. James M'Cune Smith.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - January 19, 1861

Speaker or author: Smith, James McCune, 1813-1865

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer sternly responds to a letter previously published in the newspaper. He defends his affiliation with the African Civilization Society and insists that it is not associated with Colonization in any fashion.

Description of file(s): two scanned, two columned, newspaper pages

Subtitle: A New Way to Pay Old Debts.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - January 21, 1860

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer re-writes a popular play and uses it as an allegory of the current state of the "peculiar institution" of slavery that is dividing the country.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: The Law of Nature.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - January 28, 1860

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer responds to a speech given by Charles O'Connor in which he proclaimed that slavery was "ordained by nature." The writer points out several theories to the contrary proposed by some of the world's greatest thinkers.

Description of file(s): two scanned newspaper pages (four columns)

Subtitle: Our Paper.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - July 23, 1859

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer stresses the importance and value of a weekly newspaper to people of African descent. The newspaper offers not only news that affects them directly, but also a sense of community and support in working together toward a common cause of elevation and improvement.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: John Clancy on George Bancroft.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - March 8, 1862

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer gives brief biographical portraits of George Bancroft and John Clancey, including his opinions of these two men.

Description of file(s): two scanned, two columned, newspaper pages

Subtitle: What a Breeze!

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - November 12, 1859

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer describes the fearful atmosphere of the country following the actions of John Brown and during the days of his trial.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Passing For--Colored.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - October 26, 1861

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer discusses caste and prejudice in the U.S. and Hayti. Prejudice in Hayti is mostly based in caste, with those of African descent fighting against mulattoes. In the U.S. prejudice is based in race and nationality and often leveled at the Irish and German immigrants equally with African Americans.

Description of file(s): two scanned newspaper pages (three columns)

Title: William Wells Brown

Speaker or author: Brown, William Wells, 1814?-1884

Newspaper or publication: Liberator

Speech delivered before a large meeting in London regarding the status of the anti-slavery movement in the U. S. The speaker was responding to another speaker who insisted that the free people of color living in the eastern states had a better life than those enslaved in the south.

Description of file(s): PDF 6 page, 1,788 word document (text and images)

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Records (38)

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