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Black Abolitionist Archive

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Subtitle: What are Our Freemen in the East Doing?

Title: Pacific Appeal - March 5, 1864

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Pacific Appeal (1862 - 188?)

The writer tells his readers that the Emancipation Proclamation was just a starting point for the work that lies ahead for all African Americans. Now is the time for the elevation of the race and the fight against prejudice. The key to success is an improvement of moral character and social standing.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Ought the American Colored People of this Coast to Celebrate the Ensuing Fourth of July?

Title: Pacific Appeal - May 2, 1863

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Pacific Appeal (1862 - 188?)

The writer addresses the question of whether African Americans should celebrate the July 4th holiday since it doesn't really mark their freedom like it does for white Americans. He suggests that from now on the celebration of the emancipation of the British West Indies (usually celebrated on August 1st) be celebrated on July 4th. This way, the Fourth of July could truly be a national holiday giving all Americans a way to celebrate freedom.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Prejudice.

Title: Pacific Appeal - November 15, 1862

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Pacific Appeal (1862 - 188?)

The writer offers an article published in another newspaper as an example of the way fear, hatred and prejudice are spreading through New York as the effective date of the Emancipation Proclamation draws near. The article relates stories of lustful crimes and violence already taking place that the city expects will increase with the official end of slavery.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: The Irrepressible Conflict.

Title: Pacific Appeal - November 22, 1862

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Pacific Appeal (1862 - 188?)

The writer prepares his readers for the freedom that awaits the country as the Emancipation Proclamation goes into effect on January 1, 1863. He tells them how this conflict, based in the political battle over slavery, had evolved, and that it is now nearing its end.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: The Great Coming Event.

Title: Pacific Appeal - November 29, 1862

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Pacific Appeal (1862 - 188?)

The writer tells his readers that opposition to the Emancipation Proclamation has failed to sway the president, and that it will go into effect as planned on January 1, 1863.

Description of file(s): one scanned newspaper column

Subtitle: The Signs of the Times.

Title: Pacific Appeal - October 18, 1862

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Pacific Appeal (1862 - 188?)

The writer comments on the current political situation in the country in the midst of the Civil War.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: The Ensuing First of January.

Title: Pacific Appeal - October 3, 1863

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Pacific Appeal (1862 - 188?)

The writer asks his readers to consider how the January 1st anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation should be celebrated.

Description of file(s): one scanned newspaper column

Subtitle: Equitable Laws, or the Practical Result of Legislating on the Principle of "The Greatest Good of the Greatest Number."

Title: Pacific Appeal - October 31, 1863

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Pacific Appeal (1862 - 188?)

The writer sees a more liberal government taking shape. He notes that all the fears associated with the emancipation of slaves have not been realized. He emphasizes that "freemen and freedmen" alike demonstrate loyalty and patriotism despite prejudicial treatment.

Description of file(s): one scanned newspaper column

Title: Robert Purvis

Speaker or author: Purvis, Robert, 1810-1898

Newspaper or publication: Presscopy -- New York Public Library -- Schomburg Collection

The speaker rejoiced in the recent emancipation of the slaves but stressed that the battle for improving the condition of the formerly enslaved and ending the prevelent prejudice would offer the Abolitionists continued work.

Description of file(s): PDF 6 page, 2,058 word document (text and images)

Title: Robert Purvis

Speaker or author: Purvis, Robert, 1810-1898

Newspaper or publication: National Anti-Slavery Standard

The speaker rejoiced in the recent emancipation of the slaves but stressed that the battle for improving the condition of the formerly enslaved and the prevalent prejudice would offer the Abolitionists continued work.

Description of file(s): PDF 7 page, 2,084 word document (text and images)

Title: Robert Purvis

Speaker or author: Purvis, Robert, 1810-1898

Newspaper or publication: National Anti-Slavery Standard

Speech given to commemorate the Emancipation Proclamation and praise Abraham Lincoln for freeing the slaves.

Description of file(s): PDF 3 page, 658 word document (text and images)

Title: Thomas H. Street

Speaker or author: Street, Thomas H.

Newspaper or publication: Pacific Appeal

Speech delivered during a celebration of the first anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. The speaker traced the history of slavery from its ancient beginning to the progress made since emancipation. He stressed that it takes both the white and black races of American people working together to make the country great. He encouraged all African Americans to continue to improve themselves to meet the social challenges that lay ahead.

Description of file(s): PDF 12 page, 2,711 word document (text and images)

Title: Thomas Myers Decatur Ward

Speaker or author: Ward, Thomas Myers Decatur

Newspaper or publication: Pacific Appeal

The speaker included several important quotes against slavery by known and respected people. He then traced the history of slavery in the U.S. and praised Abraham Lincoln for its end. He stressed the future need for progress, education, and patience among the newly freed slaves.

Description of file(s): PDF 11 page, 2,307 word document (text and images)

Title: Thomas Myers Decatur Ward

Speaker or author: Ward, Thomas Myers Decatur

Newspaper or publication: Pacific Appeal

Hopeful speech regarding the future of African Americans now that the Emancipation Proclamation has been delivered and the slaves are free. The speaker stressed the sacrifice of those who had fought and died for freedom.

Description of file(s): PDF 10 page, 2,200 word document (text and images)

Title: W. J. O. Bryant

Speaker or author: Bryant, W. J. O.

Newspaper or publication: Pacific Appeal

The speaker encouraged continued efforts in the work towards complete abolition. He emphasized that while Abraham Lincoln's proclamation given the year before had set more than 4 million slaves free, that some states were excluded and work needs to continue to abolish slavery completely.

Description of file(s): PDF 4 page, 920 word document (text and images)

Title: William Cooper Nell

Speaker or author: Nell, William C. (William Cooper), 1816-1874.

Newspaper or publication: Liberator

Speech given celebrating the Emancipation Proclamation and honoring those who fought for this glorious event. The speaker acknowledged the contributions of African American heroes of the Civil War, the American Revolution, and the long struggle for emancipation.

Description of file(s): PDF 3 page, 760 word document (text and images)

Title: William Henry Hall

Speaker or author: Hall, W. H. (William Henry), fl. 1863-1864

Newspaper or publication: Presscopy -- Harvard University, Cambridge -- Rare Books and Manuscripts

Although California had entered the Union as a free state, the speaker joined those in the state government in questioning what social and political changes would take place nationally now that the Emancipation Proclamation had been delivered and the war was at an end.

Description of file(s): PDF 11 page, 2,632 word document (text and images)

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Records (37)

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