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Records (34)
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Subtitle: The Influence of Early Education.

Title: National Reformer - February, 1839

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: National Reformer (1838 - 1839)

The writer expresses his thoughts on a recent book titled The History of the New York African Free School written by one of the school's professors. He notes that emphasis placed on the idea that black Americans are "descendents of Africa" and should therefore be pitied just encourages the caste system that is at the root of national prejudice. African Americans are American first and foremost; this is their country and they are Americans regardless of the color of their skin. Making this distinction encourages separation in a situation that is only remedied by unity.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Salutatory.

Title: Pacific Appeal - Aprill 5, 1862

Speaker or author: Bell, Philip A.

Newspaper or publication: Pacific Appeal (1862 - 188?)

The editor introduces the newspaper and gives a brief history of his work on newspapers over the past 25 years.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: The Concert.

Title: Pacific Appeal - December 6, 1862

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Pacific Appeal (1862 - 188?)

The writer tells his readers that a benefit concert will be held to raise funds to keep the newspaper in publication. He shares a partial list (from memory) of all African American newspapers that have been published since 1835.

Description of file(s): one scanned newspaper column

Subtitle: Military Tactics.

Title: Pacific Appeal - February 21, 1863

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Pacific Appeal (1862 - 188?)

The writer urges his readers to become acquainted with military tactics as part of their U. S. citizenship. In this way, if it was ever necessary for them to defend their freedom, they would be prepared.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Our Assumed Literary Apathy.

Title: Pacific Appeal - October 10, 1863

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Pacific Appeal (1862 - 188?)

The writer comments on William Wells Brown's reply to criticism of his book, The Black Man, His Antecedents, Genius, and Achievements. Mr. Brown's belief is that African Americans don't appreciate the literary work of other African Americans.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Title: Phillip A. Bell

Speaker or author: Bell, Philip A.

Newspaper or publication: Pacific Appeal

Overview of a speech in which the speaker praised the people and community of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada). He stressed the importance of newspapers such as the Pacific Appeal and Anglo-African in keeping the African American community strong, but advocated union with other communities and not isolation.

Description of file(s): PDF 2 page, 278 word document (text and images)

Subtitle: The Last Gun from the Satanic Press.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - April 14, 1860

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer compares the living conditions of the black and white populations in New York City. He also shares a comparison of the way the local press is reporting these conditions and how this reporting is racially biased. He shares with his readers the current status of the Anglo-African publications, and the daily social pressures endured by the editor and staff.

Description of file(s): two scanned, three columned, newspaper pages

Subtitle: The Slave Trade.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - April 27, 1861

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

Although illegal, greed and corruption within government agencies has kept alive the African Slave Trade. The writer expects the Lincoln Administration to put an end to this once and for all.

Description of file(s): one scanned newspaper column

Subtitle: The Weekly Anglo-African.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - December 15, 1860

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer encourages current subscribers to continue their subscriptions, and new readers to subscribe. He emphasizes the value of the newspaper; and adds that those who "send us three yearly subscriptions" will receive a bound copy of the Anglo-African Magazine..."

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: America Versus Liberia.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - July 23, 1859

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer relates the story of a recent immigrant to Liberia who was charged an excess duty when attempting to ship produce from Liberia to the U.S. This, he believes, is an injustice and not encouraging of friendly relations with the U.S.'s own colony in Africa.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Subtitle: Our Enterprise.

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - June 9, 1860

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The editor responds to an article published in another newspaper regarding African American publications such as the Anglo-African Magazine. He discusses the overall racial oppression in the U.S. that makes this type of publication difficult but at the same time extremely important.

Description of file(s): two scanned newspaper pages (three columns)

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - May 4, 1861

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer tells his readers that an "Anglo-African" is an "Englishman of African descent," not African American. Since there are so few Anglo-Africans in the U.S., the newspaper will be changing its name "week after next." He doesn't, however, tell readers what the new name will be.

Description of file(s): one scanned newspaper column

Subtitle: What shall be done with the Freedmen?

Title: Weekly Anglo-African - November 30, 1861

Speaker or author: editor

Newspaper or publication: Weekly Anglo-African (1859 - 1862)

The writer discusses options for accepting newly freed slaves into the social structure. He uses the West Indies after emancipation as an example. He notes that in many ways poor white people in the slave states are "lower than the slaves; they are slaves without masters." He wonders here if the government, in an effort to raise the status of these poor white citizens, will indirectly raise the status of the slaves once they are free.

Description of file(s): one scanned, two columned, newspaper page

Title: William Howard Day

Speaker or author: Day, William Howard, d. 1900

Newspaper or publication: Presscopy -- Birmingham, England -- Public Library

The speaker presented an overview of the goals of the African Aid Society to help fugitive slaves who had escaped to Canada immigrate to Africa. He blamed the over-reliance on the economic value of cotton for continued slavery in the U.S.

Description of file(s): PDF 1 page, 374 word document (text and image)

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Records (34)

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